THE FORUMS

December 6th, 2016
How to Get Good at ANYTHING, FAST. with positive supporting scientific studies provided. [UPDATED 1]
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MARSZ00

MARSZ00

Respected Member

Join Date: 05/10/2012 | Posts: 367

Hello fellow gentlemen. I haven't posted here in awhile. I've been around, not only making progress in game but making progress in the structure of game. That's what this thread is for right now: how to get good at anything fast, or how to structure your game so you learn quickly and efficiently. None of the information I'm providing is new but it's also unlikely that many of you are acquainted with the breakdown. So without anything further, let me teach you how to learn anything you want quickly.


null
First I want to detach you from some quick misconceptions about the structure of quickly learning a skill I'm about to show you.

1. Learning, practising, and mastering a skill will be challenging and often seem redundant on some days. This is how it is with everything you commit yourself to. The human brain likes habit and routine but it also gets bored of it and wanders from time to time. This thread will not provide you with any motivational hoo-hahs or anything from Tony Robbins to keep you going, aside from the possibility that there is greatness out there, greatness for you to achieve if you can picture it.

2. The standard time agreed on by scientists is that it takes you roughly 7 years to master a skill. I'm not sure if the "7 years to master a skill" idea includes the formula I'm about to show you to quickly learn something. However, assuming that it doesn't, applying this formula often should cut down the skill learning process to 5-6 years. If committing to something or the 7 years ahead irritates you, you might like this very short comic, which helps put things in perspective.

http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=2722

3. As Tyler once said, no one is above the process. Don't try to bunk it and find shortcuts when it comes to learning something new, unless part of that learning is finding the cracks in the pavement. One of the most well-known and general rules of life is that you get back what you put into it. Period. If you want to learn something, you're going to have to work at it. You can have fun with what you practice and what you do and have much more self-esteem for it, knowing you're doing something that will not only benefit yourself in the long run but also enjoying yourself in the short term. Or you could hate what you're doing, not give it all of your attention, and likely suffer for it. Both of these options are your decisions. Life has it's ups and downs and you won't always feel good about your learning, but if you're fiercely committed, you won't let the highs or the lows keep you out of the game for long.

null
Now we're moving onto the meat of this post: the structure for learning a skill fast. As I said earlier, this structure isn't any sort of ancient Indian secret that can only be attainable through depriving yourself of all communication and disappearing from civilization as you meditate for hours in a pitch black cave until you see a vision or your "animal." People have been using this technique for years, yet it's unlikely you've heard of it before. It's a structure used by great and powerful musicians to up their game. All of the leading members in their particular industry would have a very similar structure to how they continue to master their skills. However, only recently has their been scientific studies supporting the way they structure their learning. Here's the structure.

Simply, you practice and activity you're learning for a couple of hours, then take a break and practice again. The activity and the skill you're practicing and learning should only be practiced in one to three hour sessions. The break should be at minimum one hour. You can pile together multiple sessions each day to learn quickly.

As I mentioned, major musicians use this technique all the time, each with similar intervals, to reach the peak of their game. They also devote most of there free time into their career but we know that you can still see significant improvement just by pooling two or three hours each day into practicing something. However, by introducing multiple sessions to learning skills, followed by relatively shorter rest periods, you will train yourself much faster.

null
Here's a breakdown of a schedule I compiled for myself last week. As you can tell, I had an open schedule. I rounded up some buddies for some day game, since I had some evening plans. For my break time, I went to a coffeee shop or a park bench to relax. After my break, I went to my next location. If this looks and sounds like a schedule for an academic institution to you, like for a college or a high school, you'd be right: schools use this sort of system all the time to smooth out the learning process. Ever wonder what homework was for? Maybe that one or two hour burst of focus for learning something? Or breaks between classes?

If you're a science head like me, you're probably asking where are the scientific studies supporting what I'm saying. Well I wasn't lying. Here's the link to the study.

http://www.kurzweilai.net/new-phase-of-synaptic-development-is-key-to-le...

The takeaway from the article, even if you aren't a science junkie, is this:
It’s well known that synapses in the brain, the connections between neurons and other cells that allow for the transmission of information, grow when they’re exposed to a stimulus.

“Based on our data, it seems like synapses that have recently been strengthened are peculiarly vulnerable — more stimulation can actually wipe out the effects of learning.

"The three synapse phases
Wen found that during this first day of learning, synapses go through three distinct phases.
In the initiation phase, synaptic plasticity is spurred on by NMDA receptors. Over the next 12 hours or so, the synapses get stronger and stronger.
As the stimulus is repeated, the NDMA receptors change their function and start to weaken the synapses in what the researchers have called the labile phase.
After a few hours of weakening, another receptor, mGluR5, initiates a stabilization phase during which the synapses maintain their residual strength.


If you want to learn something quickly, expose yourself to the activity with a short break afterwards in multiple sessions every day. If you want to become a good painter, practice a beginner's technique for 2 hours, followed by an hour break. Repeat this session throughout the day at least once or twice more and try and get 2 or 3 sessions in for every day of the week. You will notice results. By giving your brain time to rest, followed by more skill building, you can speed up the learning process greatly towards something you want to learn.

Rome wasn't built in a day. You won't become a master overnight but you will become a lot better in a shorter time frame. It's likely that people will notice your abilities within a week or two if you maintain a skill-rest structure multiple times at least semi-daily.

Marco

EDIT I noticed many people don't enjoy the scheduling aspects of things. I've come across two articles on a blog that tell you why scheduling is important. The blog articles are also backed by concrete science. Have a look.
http://www.generationbc.blogspot.ca/2013/08/increase-goal-attainment-for...
http://generationbc.blogspot.ca/2013/08/increase-goal-attainment-pt-ii-p...
Both articles are on how to get successful at achieving your goals.
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#1
la leuce

la leuce

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Join Date: 08/10/2009 | Posts: 510

 I'm a major musian and I don't do this...

The best typically don't "take breaks"     (Though I'm not saying you're wrong I'm simply saying some thoughts I have on the matter)

We tend to unconciously distract our minds from what we're doing.

We'll create a reference point that makes us feel something different from the activity we're doing and then abuse it to the fullest.

For example, if I was doing pick-up I might say something like "bang bang" (A reference from a Lady GaGa song ;D)

That way we never "get bored" because we're always involving different character traits into what we're doing.

I like the idea of the schedule, however, I've seen A LOT of people try these and get bored of them.

Once they get bored they simply attribute it to "being bored of the game" and flat out quit.

Good post though,

La leuce
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#2

Lotus.SD

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Join Date: 02/24/2013 | Posts: 128

 Thanks for this, good read
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#3
Blue x Light

Blue x Light

Respected Member

Join Date: 04/16/2008 | Posts: 510

 you need breaks.... you're missing the point there ... taking breaks = not taking breaks because you need them.... work is play and play is work... so do both hard. 

Thanks for sharing... off to work now ;]

x

Avo
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#4
MARSZ00

MARSZ00

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Join Date: 05/10/2012 | Posts: 367

Schedules are important to get yourself moving. Sure, people get bored with schedules. But people get bored without schedules as well, for the same reasons. Schedules are there to get your eye back on the ball. I already said at the beginning of this post that motivation will be a and this post isn't intended to motivate you anything more than giving you a good formula for quick learning.

Taking breaks between learning is necessary to give your brain some room to relax. If you're doing a pure 3 hour of intense practice, you can afford an hour of a break.
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#5

Rotundum

Senior Member

Join Date: 05/31/2010 | Posts: 126

Let's get even more structured and put together a curriculum for a whole semester. Learning objectives and the whole shebang.
That would be about making progress.

I've seen it somewhere on the internet but can't find it again.
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#6

iMaverick

Junior Member

Join Date: 05/10/2012 | Posts: 6

 good one!
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#7
MARSZ00

MARSZ00

Respected Member

Join Date: 05/10/2012 | Posts: 367

Bump with more supporting articles.
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